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New management of The Breakers undeterred by building owner’s lawsuit

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CJ Dablo
Staff Writer

Soon after state authorities ended The Breakers’s time as an assisted-living community for seniors, a new company announced plans to transform the building’s residential quarters into apartments at the historic site.

Up until two weeks ago, The Breakers of Long Beach had been an assisted-living facility for seniors. Solid Landings hopes to transform the building into modern apartments at a market-rate price.

Up until two weeks ago, The Breakers of Long Beach had been an assisted-living facility for seniors. Solid Landings hopes to transform the building into modern apartments at a market-rate price.

The Breakers is still living in the shadow of its previous life. Now considered a historical landmark, the building on Ocean Boulevard has had many chapters, but the latest one ended bitterly after state authorities revoked the license for The Breakers to operate as an assisted-living facility.

Enough complaints lodged against The Breakers and its administrator prompted the California Department of Social Services to investigate serious allegations of “failure to provide basic care.”

The department noted instances in which staff did not provide sufficient follow-up for the medical needs of a few residents and also reported that, from 2011 through 2014, the facility, on several occasions, did not provide a clean, sanitary environment. The department noted the presence of mice and roaches.

The complaints against The Breakers proved serious enough to draw legal action, including a class-action lawsuit filed on behalf of the residents. The firm Garcia, Artigliere & Medby announced the suit in a press release, noting that it will represent 100 residents.

“The lawsuit alleges that The Breakers of Long Beach and its administrator Dan Cooper intentionally misappropriated funds intended for resident care and rent for personal profit and gain, knowing the facility’s license was going to be revoked as a direct result of multiple health, moral and safety violations,” the press release states.

Stephen Garcia, the head partner of the law firm, did not respond to requests from the Signal Tribune for an interview. However, the release did include a statement from Garcia.

“It’s about time The Breakers of Long Beach reaped what it sowed,” Garcia said. “It’s appalling that a facility would place such greed and profit over their patients’ well-being.”

The Breakers is owned by Sign of the Dove, headed by president Bernard Rosenson. As part of the agreement to revoke the license, Rosenson gave the senior residents a 60-day notice that the assisted-living facility would close and numerous residents would need to find new homes, with the understanding that many of the more independent seniors did have an option to stay and live under the management of a new company, Solid Landings Behavioral Health, according to previous media reports. A spokesman from the Department of Social Services confirmed that the assisted-living facility closed on May 31.

Rosenson had agreed to lease to Solid Landings, which advertises its services in addiction-recovery programs. Other news outlets had previously reported that there was no approval for the facility to be used for a recovery program.

Without the ability to run a recovery program in the building, they announced plans to offer apartments on ocean-front property. Media spokesman Adam Englander said in an email to the Signal Tribune that Solid Landings assumed the lease of the building on June 1.

“We are busy planning and working with the City of Long Beach to develop The Breakers into market-rate apartments and are very eager to put our plan into action,” Englander said in his statement. “Our plan to reimagine and transform The Breakers will be carried out in several phases, which will start with the renovation of several rooms, the lobby, and other areas inside the building. Our goal is to present a new, modern, and affordable residence in this historic building located in the heart of the city. Along with its central location and sweeping views of Long Beach, the new Breakers will offer modern and convenient amenities fit for city living. We are going through the standard approvals procedure with the City, and we hope to open as soon as we complete this process.”

Englander acknowledged that Rosenson and Sign of the Dove still own the building.

Calls to Rosenson were not returned prior to press time.

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New management of The Breakers undeterred by building owner’s lawsuit