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Green-waste recycling gets green light from SH City Council

Commercial businesses, including some multi-unit family homes, must recycle organic waste beginning Jan. 1

Dan+Sundstrom+%28right%2C+at+podium%29%2C+owner+of+Ten+Mile+Brewing+Company%2C+presented+to+the+Signal+Hill+City+Council+about+his+business+during+the+Nov.+13+council+meeting%E2%80%99s+%E2%80%9Csmall-business+spotlight.%E2%80%9D
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Green-waste recycling gets green light from SH City Council

Dan Sundstrom (right, at podium), owner of Ten Mile Brewing Company, presented to the Signal Hill City Council about his business during the Nov. 13 council meeting’s “small-business spotlight.”

Dan Sundstrom (right, at podium), owner of Ten Mile Brewing Company, presented to the Signal Hill City Council about his business during the Nov. 13 council meeting’s “small-business spotlight.”

Anita W. Harris | Signal Tribune

Dan Sundstrom (right, at podium), owner of Ten Mile Brewing Company, presented to the Signal Hill City Council about his business during the Nov. 13 council meeting’s “small-business spotlight.”

Anita W. Harris | Signal Tribune

Anita W. Harris | Signal Tribune

Dan Sundstrom (right, at podium), owner of Ten Mile Brewing Company, presented to the Signal Hill City Council about his business during the Nov. 13 council meeting’s “small-business spotlight.”

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At its Nov. 13 meeting, the Signal Hill City Council approved two environmental measures– green-waste recycling for commercial businesses and an electric-vehicle charging-station policy– along with a contract to improve internet connectivity for municipal departments.

It also reminded residents that officer nominations for two council seats and the city clerk and treasurer positions are open until Dec. 7 at 4:30pm. Voting will take place March 5.

Green-waste recycling
The council agreed to introduce an ordinance amending the city’s refuse code to establish a mandatory organic-recycling program for commercial businesses, including multi-family dwellings with five or more units.

City Manager Charlie Honeycutt said that program is required by a 2014 California law–AB 1826: Mandatory Commercial Organics Recycling– which is part of the State’s efforts to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions.

Courtesy EDCO
Signal Hill commercial businesses will be required to start recycling organic waste by Jan. 1 using an EDCO green-waste container (example pictured), according to an ordinance introduced by the Signal Hill City Council at its Nov. 13 meeting.

“[The State] identified landfills as one of the biggest methane producers, which is considered a greenhouse gas,” Honeycutt said.

Kelli Tunnicliff, public-works director, said that the State has established a series of recycling goals over the years.

“The intent of these collective bills is to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions by 40 percent from 1990 levels by the year 2030,” she said.

She further said that organic waste is defined as biodegradable material coming from a plant or an animal, including food waste, green waste, landscape and pruning waste, garden and lawn clippings and nonhazardous wood waste.

“All commercial businesses that generate four or more cubic yards of commercial solid waste will be required to establish an organic collection and recycling program,” she said. “Under the law, multi-family buildings of five or more units are considered a commercial business and must also comply with the new organic-waste regulation.”

Tunnicliff added that the regulation would apply to 200 commercial businesses and 57 multi-family dwellings in Signal Hill and that EDCO would charge commercial rates according to its most recent 2018 contract with the City.
The cost to commercial businesses for EDCO’s services, including supplying bins, will be $69.10 per month and $65.12 per month for multi-family dwellings, she said.

The council will conduct a second hearing of the ordinance at its next meeting on Nov. 27 so that the policy can implemented by Jan. 1, as required by the law, she said.

“Five businesses have elected to implement an organics program ahead of the schedule,” Tunnicliff said. “These include In-N-Out, Mother’s Market, Target, Costco and Food 4 Less.”

Tunnicliff said that pending state legislation may also require EDCO to provide single-family and smaller multi-family residences with 65-gallon green-waste disposal containers.

“This issue is just continuing to grow and so we’re working very closely with EDCO,” she said. “We understand the complexity of adding a third bin.”

EV-charger policy
The council also approved a new electric-vehicle (EV) charging-station policy for municipal developments.

“The Sustainable City Committee and staff has been working for a couple of months on developing an electric-vehicle charging-station policy that would apply to […] City-owned facilities,” Honeycutt said.

Colleen Doan, planning manager, said that the policy was the next step in the City’s efforts to comply with environmental-sustainability goals stemming from United Nations (UN) recommendations in 2005.

“The [UN Urban Environmental Reports] program provided a framework for local agencies to develop and accomplish local sustainability goals and to become self-certified ‘green’ cities,” Doan said.

Doan said that in 2012 the City adopted a municipal green-building policy, which became a template for the EV charging-station policy.

“Both policies […] put the city in a leadership role with a commitment to implement the policy in municipal-development projects and encourage, but not require, implementation in private-sector development projects,” Doan said.

She said that the new policy exceeds current State requirements for charger installations.

“For municipal projects, the EV charging-station policy applies to new developments greater than 5,000 square feet and additions exceeding 50 percent of an existing building,” she said. “City council will pre-approve the details.”

Spectrum internet
Finally, the council approved a three-year agreement with Spectrum Enterprise to provide fiberoptic internet services to all City facilities.

“An evaluation was performed earlier this year of the City’s network,” Finance Director Scott Williams said. “There were deficiencies in data services, as well as the opportunity to improve internet bandwidth and data-server delivery speeds.”

Williams said that the City would not incur any additional cost for the enhancements. He also said that the new cloud-based enterprise-resource planning (ERP) system is now in operation and would benefit from higher speeds.

“The most dramatic [improvement speed] is what we get here in City Hall, going from 10 megabits per second– which is less than an average internet [speed] in a home– to 1,000 megabits,” Williams said.

Presentations
Mariela Salgada, owner of Rug’it Cleaning at 2321 E. 28th St., #408, presented to the council about her business during the meeting’s “small-business spotlight.”

Salgada shared that her business is family-owned and five-star rated on social media.

“We operate sustainably,” she said. “We’ve launched a new product– the only 100-percent sustainable rug-pads in the market.”

Dan Sundstrom, owner of Ten Mile Brewing Company at 1136 E. Willow St., also presented on his business, noting that, after working with City staff, his company recently expanded its outdoor-patio seating by 300 square feet and extended its hours.

“We just had our one-year anniversary,” he said. “It’s been great working with the City.”

The next Signal Hill City Council meeting will take place Tuesday, Nov. 27, at 7pm in the council chamber at 2175 Cherry Ave.

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Green-waste recycling gets green light from SH City Council