‘You’re more than a death in the line of duty’

LBFD training center renamed in honor of fallen fire captain.

Residents+and+city+staff+gather+Tuesday+morning+at+the+Long+Beach+Fire+Department+Regional+Training+Center+for+a+ceremony+in+which+the+facility+was+renamed+in+honor+of+Fire+Capt.+David+Rosa%2C+who+had+perished+one+year+earlier+in+the+line+of+duty.
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‘You’re more than a death in the line of duty’

Residents and city staff gather Tuesday morning at the Long Beach Fire Department Regional Training Center for a ceremony in which the facility was renamed in honor of Fire Capt. David Rosa, who had perished one year earlier in the line of duty.

Residents and city staff gather Tuesday morning at the Long Beach Fire Department Regional Training Center for a ceremony in which the facility was renamed in honor of Fire Capt. David Rosa, who had perished one year earlier in the line of duty.

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Residents and city staff gather Tuesday morning at the Long Beach Fire Department Regional Training Center for a ceremony in which the facility was renamed in honor of Fire Capt. David Rosa, who had perished one year earlier in the line of duty.

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Residents and city staff gather Tuesday morning at the Long Beach Fire Department Regional Training Center for a ceremony in which the facility was renamed in honor of Fire Capt. David Rosa, who had perished one year earlier in the line of duty.

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Exactly one year after Long Beach Fire Department Captain David Rosa was killed in the line of duty, his family, coworkers and fellow community members were gathered at the city’s firefighter-training center for a ceremony in which the facility was being renamed in his honor.

On Tuesday morning, the City of Long Beach renamed the Long Beach Fire Department Regional Training Center, located at 2249 Argonne Ave., to the Long Beach Fire Department Captain David Rosa Regional Training Center and unveiled a new sign to commemorate the occasion.

Deputy Chief-Fire Marshal Matthew Gruneisen led the ceremony and described the impact Rosa had on those he served, both professionally and personally.

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In a ceremony Tuesday morning, the Long Beach Fire Department Regional Training Center was renamed in honor of fallen Fire Capt. David Rosa.

“A year ago, the city, our community and our profession were devastated by Dave’s death,” Gruneisen said, in his opening remarks. “Today, we have the opportunity to celebrate his life and the sacrifice that Captain David Rosa made, and we’re going to do that by renaming the Long Beach Fire Department Regional Training Center in his honor.”

Seventeen years of serving as a firefighter had prepared Rosa for the numerous perils associated with his job, and he had spent most of his career working in the busiest stations in the city, even training new recruits on how to be safe. However, when he and his colleagues responded to a fire alarm at a local retirement home in the early-morning hours of June 25, 2018, the real danger they faced was one that no one had anticipated.

As Rosa and other firefighters entered the multiple-story facility in the 600 block of East 4th Street around 3:49am, one of its residents opened fire on them, shooting Rosa, his coworker Ernesto Torres and another resident of the home, killing Rosa and injuring the other two men.

Rosa’s almost two decades of service and 45 years of life came to a tragic end, as he was murdered by one of the citizens he was trying to protect.

At Tuesday’s ceremony, Mayor Robert Garcia spoke about the importance of fire-safety personnel and emphasized that the City and residents will be there for them.

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This week, the Long Beach Fire Department Regional Training Center was renamed in honor of Fire Capt. David Rosa, who had been killed one year earlier while responding to a fire at a local retirement home.

“Days like this, I think, serve as an important reminder that we have a community that will always support our firefighters. We will always support you guys– 100 percent,” Garcia said. “And it’s important for cities to always recognize and uplift the amazing work that you do– running into danger and being there on the other end of the call when people in our community need your support.”

Rosa’s wife Lynley also spoke about the fire captain, characterizing the influence he had as far-reaching.

“You served so many people,” she said. “I suppose that’s part of the reason they have wanted to remember and dedicate this place to you now. I know you wouldn’t be comfortable with all the accolades, because you were just living. All of this is just who you are.”

She said that the “call on June 25” had a permanent impact.

“But, even more than that, honey, […] in all your decisions, all of your leadership, all of your service, all of your love to the boys and I– especially your love– we’ve been changed,” she said. “You’re more than a death in the line of duty– more than another tragedy, more than a fire captain or a husband, father, son, brother and friend. You’re a man whose daily decisions have had a lasting impact on us all.”