Video maps out 30 years of statewide earthquakes

Earthquake talk is back in the minds of Southern Californians since the 6.4-magnitude foreshock in Ridgecrest rocked the region on July 4. The waves from the quake were felt in parts of Nevada and Long Beach.

The incident prompted Long Beach Mayor Robert Garcia to ask the city manager to produce a seismic report citywide.

Since then, there have been more temblors ranging from various magnitude levels.

How do all these earthquakes stack up when compared to each other?

The National Weather Service: Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (NWS: PTWC) published a video on its YouTube page which shows an animation that details the location and size of California’s earthquakes from 1989 to 2019.

The video provides a bigger picture as to where earthquakes tend to strike.

Here are the most noteworthy temblors, according to the NWS: PTWC:

• Oct. 10, 1989 — Loma Prieta — 6.9 Mw
• April 25, 1992 — Cape Mendocino — 7.2 Mw (caused a small tsunami)
• June 28, 1992 — Landers — 7.3 Mw
• Jan. 17, 1994 — Northridge — 6.7 Mw
• Oct. 16, 1999 — Hector Mine — 7.1 Mw
• Dec. 22, 2003 — San Simeon — 6.6 Mw
• April 4, 2010 — Baja California (Mexico) — 7.2 Mw
• Aug. 24, 2014 — South Napa — 6.0 Mw
• July 4, 2019 — Ridgecrest — 6.4 Mw
• July 5, 2019 — Ridgecrest — 7.1 Mw