Police arrest a second suspect for allegedly using other student’s email to send CSULB violent threats

Images on social media of chairs and tables barricading doors during lockdown spark questions about classroom locks.

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Police arrest a second suspect for allegedly using other student’s email to send CSULB violent threats

The Go Beach sign at Cal State University Long Beach.

The Go Beach sign at Cal State University Long Beach.

Lissette Mendoza | Signal Tribune

The Go Beach sign at Cal State University Long Beach.

Lissette Mendoza | Signal Tribune

Lissette Mendoza | Signal Tribune

The Go Beach sign at Cal State University Long Beach.

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The Cal State Long Beach University Police Department announced Tuesday that a second suspect was arrested in the case of a “credible threat” that was made toward the school Monday.

Police identified the second suspect as CSULB student Prateek Devulpally.

“During a post-arrest interview with University Police, Devulpally confessed to illegally accessing another student’s email account to send the threatening email while both students were on campus,” the school announced in a statement Tuesday. “Devulpally was booked at the Long Beach Jail on one felony count of […] criminal threats and one felony count of […] ‘knowingly and without permission uses or causes to be used computer services.'”

During a press conference Monday, police revealed that a female student was in custody for the alleged threats. An investigation proved that the female student did not send the threatening emails. She is complying with police as authorities continue to investigate.

During Monday’s lockdown, students posted pictures on social media of desks and chairs piled up against classroom doors as they prepared for a potential threat. The pictures sparked discussion online about classroom locks and why some rooms on campus did not have that function.

Jeff Cook, associate vice president for Strategic Communications at CSULB, said that newer buildings built post 2017 did include rooms that have locks on their doors.

He said that buildings that were built in the 50s and 60s did not have this function, but that school administrators had previously made the decision to gradually add locks to older buildings.

“We’ve made an investment so far of $550,000 in the retrofitting process,” Cook said. “The initial phase of this work will conclude at the end of the calendar year.”

The school will continue to add locks to its older buildings once budgeting plans are set.

“I know that this is a top priority for the president,” Cook said. “So, the work will be ongoing.”